Murina Movie Review and Film Summary: Best Movie Review 2022

Welcome to IMDB Indiataza. Here in this content, you will get to know about Murina Movie Review and Film Summary. The young lead character of this film, Julija (Gracija Filipovic), observes an elderly woman cleaning a fish in the kitchen of her home. The old woman comments, “Look how she bit her own flesh to set herself free.” That sentence may be used, to sum up, Antoneta Alamat Kusijanovi’s subtly astonishing film.

Murina Movie Review
Murina Movie Review. Photo: imdb.com

The bond between Julija and her father, Ante, is strained. Everyone in Ante’s life seems to have a tense relationship with him. They reside on a beautiful Croatian island with Julija’s mother, Nela. Everything is sloped, and there are old stone houses, blue skies, and blue water. The family’s home has a yacht docked nearby, and Ante (a grizzled, beardless Leon Lucev) curses the partying youths out. It appears that his preferred method of communicating is cursing.

The upcoming evening is one to remember. Ante is excited to host his old friend Javier (Cliff Curtis), a maestro of business and first-class wheeler-dealer, to dinner. In exchange for an apartment in Zagreb, he expects to sell his land to “Javi” and give up his life of spearfishing (the title of the film is a term for a Mediterranean moray eel). Julija, who resembles a mermaid in all but name, recoils at the thought of living somewhere other than the sea.

Her white one-piece swimming suit is something that both her mother and father find offensive as she moves about the house and its surroundings. When mother Nela (Danica Curcic) says something hurtful to Ante, Julija is told that she is “bare.” The statuesque Filipovi portrays a young woman who, although being at an age when everyone else appears unable to help but notice her physique, is relatively unconcerned about it (including one of the mooks on the party yacht). And Javier, a tough, independent man, notices it too when he gets there.

Not in a manner that is even remotely creepy. However, as his visit progresses, Julija discovers Nela’s shared past with Javier and Ante. She is perplexed to discover a copy of Business Week with Javier on the cover while digging through Javier’s travel bag. She also finds something that might be even creepier. Her contacts with the three adults only serve to fuel her disobedience and batter her self-image. Despite the fact that she adores the ocean, she can no longer take her family. Ante also becomes more vicious as a result of her growing contempt for him.

Relationship tension exists between Julija and her father, Ante. There seems to be tension between Ante and everyone in his life. They live with Nela, Julija’s mother, on a stunning Croatian island. There are old stone houses, blue skies, and blue water, and everything is sloping. A yacht is anchored close to the family’s house, and Ante (a grizzled, beardless Leon Lucev) curses the young people who are partying out. It seems that swearing is his favored means of expression.

Murina Movie Review

The coming evening will be memorable. Ante is thrilled to host Javier, a master of business and elite wheeler-dealer, for dinner. Javier is played by Cliff Curtis. He anticipates selling his land to “Javi” in exchange for a Zagreb flat and giving up his spearfishing career (the title of the film is a term for a Mediterranean moray eel). In all but name, Julija resembles a mermaid and shudders at the idea of living anywhere else.

As she goes about the house and its surroundings, her white one-piece bathing suit is something that both her mother and father find objectionable. Julija hears mother Nela (Danica Curcic) call Ante “naked” after she insults him.

The statuesque Filipovi depicts a young woman who is largely uninterested in her body while being at an age when everyone else seems compelled to take note of it (including one of the mooks on the party yacht). And when Javier arrives, a rugged, self-reliant man, he too recognizes it.

Murina Movie Review
Murina Movie Review. Photo: inidewire.com

Not in any way that could be considered creepy. Julija learns about Nela’s history with Javier and Ante as his visit goes on. She digs through Javier’s travel luggage and is surprised to find a copy of Business Week featuring Javier on the cover. Additionally, she discovers something that may be much creepier. Contact with the three adults does nothing but encourage her misbehavior and erode her self-esteem.

She loves the water, but she can’t take her family with her anymore. Her growing disdain for him also makes Ante more vengeful.

The relationship between Julija and her father, Ante, is tense. Ante and the people in his life appear to be at odds. They reside on a beautiful Croatian island with Julija’s mother, Nela. Everything is sloping, there are old stone houses, blue skies, and blue water. The family’s home is in close proximity to a yacht, and Ante (a grizzled, beardless Leon Lucev) curses the young adults who are out having a good time. He seems to prefer using profanity as a form of expression.

The landscapes in this widescreen film are beautifully captured by Kusijanovi and cinematographer Hélène Louvart, and they are best seen on a screen that is as large as possible. “Murina” is a slow-burning film with an enigma for an ending rather than a bomb. However, it’s one of the year’s more well-rounded and enjoyable narrative releases.

Murina Movie Review
Murina Movie Review. Photo: vulture.com

Not in a manner that would be considered overly creepy. Julija discovers, however, as his visit progresses, that Nela and Javier both have a common past. She finds a copy of Business Week featuring Javier on the cover while rummaging through Javier’s travel bag and is perplexed by the discovery. Additionally, she finds a thing that might be much more disturbing. Her interactions with the adult group only fuel her disobedience, striking and prodding at her self-image. She adores the ocean, but she is unable to take her family as often as she formerly could. Furthermore, Ante’s own brutality increases as he witnesses her growing contempt for him.

The landscapes in this widescreen film are beautifully captured by Kusijanovi and cinematographer Hélène Louvart, and they are best seen on a screen that is as large as possible. “Murina” is a slow-burning film with an enigma for an ending rather than a bomb. However, it’s one of the year’s more well-rounded and enjoyable narrative releases.

Currently showing in a few theaters.

Leave a Comment